Majority of Melbourne shops to close

The majority of shops in Melbourne will be forced to close under Stage 4 restrictions.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has announced what industries can and can’t operate over the six-week lockdown period.

There are three groups of businesses – those that won’t be affected, those that will need to close and those that can continue to operate but under significantly different conditions. 

GROUP 1: BUSINESSES THAT WON’T CLOSE

  • Supermarkets
  • Grocery stores
  • Bottle shops
  • Pharmacies
  • Petrol Stations
  • Banks
  • Newsagencies post offices
  • Those involved in the frontline response

GROUP 2: INDUSTRIES WHERE ON-SITE OPERATIONS MUST CEASE (FOR SIX WEEKS)

  • Retail
  • Some manufacturing
  • Administration
  • These businesses need to close by 11.59pm on Wednesday 5 August (unless they need longer to shutdown due to safety reasons)
  • Retail businesses are permitted to operate contactless ‘click and collect’ and delivery services with strict protocols
  • Hardware stores can remain open onsite for tradespeople only

GROUP 3: INDUSTRIES PERMITTED TO OPERATE, BUT UNDER SIGNIFICANTLY DIFFERENT CONDITIONS

  • Food production
  • Waste collection
  • Supply chain logistics
  • In the meat industry, workforces will be scaled back by two thirds. Workers in abattoirs must wear PPE
  • Warehousing and distribution centres limited to no more than two-thirds the normal workforce
  • Construction sector to move to pilot light levels. Limits on people on-site. For major construction sites, the minimum required for safety but no more than 25 per cent of the normal workforce
  • Small scale construction, such as residential, limited to five people on site. 
  • All businesses have until midnight Friday to enact a COVID-safe plan.

Mr Andrews said he understood the announcement would have real and heavy consequences for a number of businesses, workers and their families. 

But he said the measures were necesssary.

“These are the decisions I’ve made because they are the decisions that will keep us safe and drive down case numbers,” he said. 

“So that at the end of six weeks, we have every chance of having got this back under control and we are not having to then countenance even further action.”